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Septic Tank and Drain Field Services
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A private onsite septic system means that the waste from your home drains (sinks, toilets, showers) goes into a septic tank, which retains the solids and lets the effluent flow into the soils on the property. Properly designed and installed these systems are functional and sanitary. Private septic systems serve more homes in the U.S. and many other countries than any other waste disposal method. When it comes to the septic tank and the septic system then one name come's { Mr Drain Septic. Putlink }. At Mr Drain we know how to maintain, fix, repair, pump, and replace your septic system. So don't delay for your septic system to break down and call today.

  • Many homeowners are unaware of the importance of periodically pumping their septic tank to remove the buildup of organic and inorganic waste that accumulates in the form of scum and sludge in the septic tank.
  • If not managed properly these solids will accumulate to a level where they are being agitated each time new waste enters the septic tank and consequently will be flushed through to the drain field plugging off the soil and leading to septic system failure, disgusting messes in your home or yard, and expensive repairs.
  Plumbing A to Z       Drain A to Z
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When do you need pump your Septic Tank ? The only way to know if the septic tank is in need of pumping is to check the level of scum and sludge in the septic tank. This is done by opening a lid and using a shovel or other suitable tool to estimate the thickness of scum in the septic tank. When the scum reaches 5" to 8" thick, it is time to pump your septic tank out. There is no certain number of years between proper septic tank maintenance. The length of time between "pumping" your septic tank is a direct result of what and how much you put in the septic tank. In our experience the average length of time for proper septic system maintenance is 5 to 8 years. However, there are septic tanks that were 20 years old and just ready for the first pumping. There are also septic tanks completely full and backing up after only 1 year.
  • Don't take anyone's word for it! Check your septic tank! Today and Call Plumbers at Mr Drain Today.
  • We recommend that new septic systems be checked after the first and second year of use, then checked every two to three years depending on the information gathered from the first two years.
  • If the scum level in your septic tank reaches 5" to 8" thick, you should seriously consider pumping your septic tank.Waiting until your septic system backs up to have it pumped, is like waiting until your car engine starts knocking and pinging and then doing an oil change.
  • New Home Buyers If you are purchasing a home with an existing, used septic system, I recommend having the septic tank pumped out and inspected prior to purchase.
Below we'll discuss the Basics of a Septic System.
 
What is a Septic System? Septic systems include buried septic tanks (sewage tanks) and drain fields. Most septic systems consist of distribution piping and leaching systems that are "gravity” systems; meaning the flow runs through piping and distribution boxes without the assistance of any mechanical device, such as a pump or siphon, but some homes pump their effluent uphill into a mound system.
 
What are the main septic system parts? The main waste line or "sewer line" connects the home's plumbing to the septic tank. Wastewater flows from the house to the septic tank. The septic tank, which is often buried just a few feet from the house foundation wall, receives all waste (solid and liquid). The tank is designed to retain waster water and allow heavy solids to settle to the bottom. These solids are partially decomposed by bacteria to form sludge. Grease and light particles float, forming a layer of scum on the top of the wastewater. Baffles installed at the inlet and outlet of the tank to help prevent scum and solids from escaping.
  • Clarified effluent is allowed to flow out of the tank into a soil absorption system. Newer septic tanks can have a partial concrete dividing wall in the center, thus making two compartments.
  • This helps ensure the sludge does not get forces out of the baffle into the drainfield. Newer tanks can also have two manhole covers, one above each baffle.
  • An effluent distribution pipe directs the flow of effluent from the septic tank to the leaching system, often connecting first to one and more distribution boxes, which in turn distribute the flow of effluent evenly into the leaching system.
 
A leaching system, or soil adsorption system, also called "drainfield”, a soakaway system, leachfield or seepage bed disperses the sewage effluent into the surrounding nature soils. There are many types of leaching systems but most common is a network of perforated pipes buried in gravel-filled trenches. The specific type utilized on a particular property depends on the soil conditions and amount of space available.

Drainfield (Trench): A solid pipe leads from the septic tank to a distribution box where the waste water is channeled into one or more perforated pipes set in trenches of gravel
  • Here the water slowly infiltrates (seeps) into the underlying soil. Dissolved wastes and bacteria in the water are trapped or adsorbed to soil particles or decomposed by microorganisms.
  • This process removes disease-causing organisms, organic matter, and most nutrients (except nitrogen and some salts). The purified wastewater then either moves to the ground water or evaporates from the soil. Trench systems are the most common type of system used in new home construction.
  • Septic systems should be inspected and pumped a minimum of once every two to five years.
  • You may not be experiencing any problem now, but a full septic tank may allow unwanted solids to flow into the drain field, which is the part of the system that consists of a distribution box, with a series of connected pipes. Each pipe allows water to flow into a bed of stones, which drain into the ground.
  • If paper and other solids flow into the drain field it becomes blocked and ineffective. A blocked drain field is costly to repair or replace.
  • Make sure to get your tank inspected whenever you feel necessary to prevent this costly maintenance.
 
Parts of Septic System A septic system has two major components: a septic tank and a drain field.

Septic Tank: Waste water flows from the house to the septic tank. The tank is designed to retain waste water and allow heavy solids to settle to the bottom. These solids are partially decomposed by bacteria to form

sludge. Grease and light particles float, forming a layer of scum on top of the waste water. Baffles installed at the inlet and outlet of the tank to help prevent scum and solids from escaping. Newer septic tanks can have a partial concrete dividing wall in the center, thus making two compartments.
  • This helps ensure the sludge does not get forced out of the baffle into the drainfield. Newer tanks can also have two manhole covers, one above each baffle.
 
Drainfield (Trench): A solid pipe leads from the septic tank to a distribution box where the waste water is channeled into one or more perforated pipes set in trenches of gravel. Here the water slowly infiltrates (seeps) into the underlying soil. Dissolved wastes and bacteria in the water are trapped or adsorbed to soil particles or decomposed by microorganisms. This process removes disease-causing organisms, organic matter, and most nutrients (except nitrogen and some salts). The purified wastewater then either moves to the ground water or evaporates from the soil.
  • Trench systems are the most common type of system used in new home construction.
 
An alternative to the common drain field is the Seepage Pit (Dry Well). In this type, liquid flows to a pre-cast tank with sidewall holes, surrounded by gravel.

(Older versions usually consist of a pit with open-jointed brick or stone walls.) Liquid seeps through the holes or joints to the surrounding soil.
 
Another alternative is the Sand Mound System: These systems are used in areas where the site is not suitable for traditional septic systems. For instance, the soil may have too much clay to allow the water to seep through at the proper rate, or the water table may be too close to the ground surface. In these systems, the waste water flows from the septic tank to a storage tank. The liquid is then pumped from the tank to perforated plastic pipes buried in a mound of sand built on the original soil surface.
  • This system provides a layer of suitable soil thick enough to ensure adequate time and distance for proper treatment of the waste water. Vegetation growing on the mound helps to evaporate some of the liquid.
  • This is particularly important in areas with shallow water tables.
 
Possible Signs of Trouble The septic tank has not been pumped out in the past five years. Even if the system appears to be working well, sludge may have built up to the point where waste water is released without sufficient time in the tank for treatment and settling of particles. This situation may result in pollution of groundwater or cause eventual clogging of the drainfield.

A wet area or standing water occurs above the drainfield. This situation can develop when sludge particles clog the drainfield, when tree roots or broken pipes keep the waste water from dispersing through the entire drainfield, or when water use in the house regularly exceeds the design capacity of the system. When these conditions occur, waste water does not move through the soil as it should, and instead rises to the surface creating a serious health risk and odor problems.
  • Toilets run slowly or backup: in the worst cases, the basement is flooded with sewage.
  • This can be the result of plugged sewer lines to the tank, a plugged inlet or outlet pipe, a full septic tank, or a failed drainfield.
  • Septic odors occur in the house, above the tank and drainfield, or escape from the vent pipe.
  • If the system is operating properly, there should be no odors. If there are odors, it can be an early warning sign that the system is failing.
Septic System Location Locating the components of your system can be difficult. Note where your drain pipe leaves the house; this will point you in the direction of the septic tank. A search in this area may reveal the septic tank inspection ports and shallow depressions marking the trenches. Unfortunately, the tank is usually unmarked. If you can not find any signs of your system, the local Health Department might have your building records on file. (In winter months, the tile lines and septic tank are usually the last place frost forms, and the first place snow melts in your yard.) Once you locate an unmarked tank, place a marker in the ground above the inspection ports and clean out manhole cover. Or, measure their exact distances from at least two reference points (such as a tree and the corner of the house) so you can easily find them again.
Maintenance Tips
INSIDE
  • Conserve water. Fix leaks and drips. If you replace old fixtures, install new "low flow" types.
  • Do not overload the system -- this is the primary cause of system failures. Early morning and bedtime are peak water use times in the bathroom. Run dishwashers and washing machines at other times of the day. Don't do all the family laundry in one day.
  • Do not use a garbage disposal or dump coffee grounds in the sink. Increasing the load of solids into the tank decreases the capacity and shortens the interval between pumpings.
  • Do not pour fats and oils down the drain. They can build up and clog the septic tank pipes.
  • Put paper towels, tissue, cigarette butts, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, tampons and other material in a trash can, not the toilet.
  • You do NOT need to add any commercial products or yeast to your system. Additives do not improve how well your system works. There are always plenty of natural bacteria available to do the job. (They come from YOUR digestive system.) In fact, additives can damage your system by breaking up the sludge and scum layers, causing them to flush out of the tank and clog the infiltration bed. Additives that say "Never worry about pumping your septic tank again" are the worst!
  • Use normal amounts of detergents, bleaches, drain cleaners, household cleaners and other products. Avoid dumping solvents like dry cleaning fluid, pesticides, photographic chemicals, paint thinner, or auto products down the drain.
 OUTSIDE
  • Direct down spouts and runoff away from the septic field to avoid saturating the area with excess water.
  • Dense grass cover and other shallow rooted plants are beneficial over a septic field. However, do not plant trees because large plant roots can clog or break the pipes.
  • Avoid compacting the soil over the infiltration area. Do not drive or park vehicles over the area and don't build a shed or driveway in this area. These activities can also crack pipes or cause the distribution box to settle unevenly, meaning that effluent will only flow into part of the drain field.
  • Tanks need to be pumped every two to five years, depending on use. If the tank gets too full, particles of scum or sludge will flush out of the tank. This material will clog the drain tiles and cause the septic system to fail.
  • Hire a licensed professional (listed in the phone book under "septic tank cleaners") to pump the waste out of your tank. The tank should be pumped out through the manhole, not the smaller inspection ports. The tank should be cleaned completely, leaving nothing in the tank. Make sure the baffles are inspected and that the tank is checked for leaks.

Contact your local Mr Drain® today to learn more about the Septic Tank
System, Tank Pumping, Drainfield Service, Repair and Replacement.

Save money call Mr. Drain ® Plumbing of Castro Valley today at
510 - 257 - 1243
We are Located at:
3056 Castro Valley Blvd Suite # 149 Castro Valley CA 94546 United States